Socio-economic Impact

There can be little doubt that food and young people are two of the most important development concerns in Africa. The problem of young people and agriculture is framed from a perspective of either ‘youth in peril’ or ‘agriculture in peril’. Depending on their starting point, most policy advocates highlight the growth and employment potential of a modernised, business-like agriculture to paint a picture of either ‘agriculture as the saviour of young people’ or ‘young people as the saviour of agriculture’.

With the essence of Agromindset’s “Green Revolution”, agriculture would be viewed as a knowledge-based entrepreneurial activity. The argument is based on the premise that smart investments in agriculture will have multiplier effects in many sectors of the economy and helps spread prosperity.

Prioritizing agricultural development would yield significant, interconnected benefits, particularly in achieving food security and reducing hunger; increasing incomes and reducing poverty; advancing the human development agenda in health and education; and reversing environmental damage.

The success of our strategies largely depends on the willingness of the new generation of literate youth to take up agriculture as a potentially rewarding livelihood focusing on agro-specific solutions that fashion agriculture as a sector with prospects to be dynamic, intellectually agile, and pragmatic.

Agriculture has evolved into agribusiness and has become a vast and complex system that reaches far beyond the farm to include all those who are involved in bringing food and fibre to consumers, but many Africans have not renewed their minds about what agriculture is. There is the need therefore to erase all misconceptions drawing back the development through agriculture.

The future of agriculture relies on the younger generation coming through to provide succession, add enthusiasm, bring fresh ideas and drive innovation. Whilst there are challenges to provide good training and the right image to attract young people to agriculture, there are opportunities and there are young people with the appetite to make agriculture their future. Accelerated agricultural growth is crucial for reducing hunger and poverty, empowering youth and women, and achieving a global partnership for development.

New technologies – getting away from the old-fashioned methods that rely on manual labour and exhaust the soil – these can only be brought in by way of the young, modern generation! A lot of jobs can be generated from the development of agribusiness. A new breed of creative and reasoning generation will emerge from the youth, who will be poised for impact and transformation and will practice agriculture every day of their lives.

Young people pursuing agriculture have a crucial role to play in making sure we have the scientific knowledge and the technology to provide the farming methods to bring about better food security for the future. This will adequately prepare them for the challenges that lie ahead and enhance their professional confidence in addressing agricultural and rural development opportunities and challenges in today’s world.

We envision careers in this field as a culmination of our varied interests. We should all be interested in encouraging young and educated people to get themselves involved in the Agricultural sector if we would ever want to see a wealthier Africa than we find it now.

A new economic vision for Ghana agricultural transformation should be guided by new conceptual frameworks that define the country as a learning society. This shift will entail placing policy emphasis on emerging opportunities such as renewing infrastructure, building human capabilities, stimulating agribusiness development, and increasing participation in the global economy. It also requires an appreciation of emerging challenges such as climate change and how they might influence current and future economic strategies.

By our strategies, Agricultural education and research will be central to helping encourage sustainable farming communities across in Ghana and Africa at large. Girls and women, who often hold the key to development, are also the target for this empowerment initiative.

Our essence does not only benefit the youth we reach out to but also the society at large. A new breed of creative and innovative generation is emerging from the youth, who would be poised for impact and transformation and would practice agriculture every day of their lives.

There’s a big generational gap that needs to be addressed immediately. Investing in the youth is an investment in the future of African agribusiness. New technologies – getting away from the old-fashioned methods that rely on manual labour and exhaust the soil – these can only be brought in by way of the young, modern generation! We attract the youth to agri-business, and start an innovation marketplace to launch new ideas and support young entrepreneurs with advisory services. The youth pursuing agriculture have a crucial role to play in making sure we have the scientific knowledge and the technology to provide the farming methods to bring about better food security for the future.


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